4 Comments

  1. Jennifer Dickerson
    June 13, 2012 @ 11:43 pm

    Wow…. I would be terrified. You are correct, I would want to run and buy the first pesticide that I could see. I am very allergic to any bee sting. Therefore, me being around bee’s and coexisting as you say would be impossible for me. Mark had a hive of Africanized bees that had made a home inside of their bricks. There was nothing that could be done by to put them down. They were immediately upon walking outside. The exterminator thought perhaps there were 10,000 bees in there. I just want the both of you being careful.

    I hope your bee hive doesn’t again grow larger. Good luck!

    Reply

    • Katie
      June 18, 2012 @ 8:38 pm

      I’d say Mark’s situation was definitely an exception!

      Reply

  2. John Robinson
    July 17, 2012 @ 10:23 am

    Great call on saving them! They are needed especially with the kill-off over the past few years that scientists are still trying to understand. There is a retired Federal Ministry of Agriculture scientist in Niagara that I know who has his own bee hives, manages others and continues to volunteer his time to try to find out why the kill off and what can be done to reverse it. He tells me it is not conclusive that pesticides have much to do with it. Have you ever thought of getting your own hives? Maybe the Queen will “dig”…”new digs” and you would get the honey!

    Reply

    • Katie
      July 17, 2012 @ 2:01 pm

      Thanks John! I wanted to see if they moved on this year on their own since this is likely a hive split from one of the neighbours. I’m not really fond of keeping bees myself but I’d be happy to let a professional pack them up and keep the honey. 🙂 We rarely notice them at ground level and their numbers have been stable so the relationship is working just fine. Thanks for the suggestion!

      Reply

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